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THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1 945 



THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief, Mary Lou Bisbee '45 

Assistant Editor, Cora Warner '46 

Business Manager — Eva Jane Sanderson '45 

Assistants, Rita Lupien '45 and Ruth Mollison '45 

Literary Editor, Shirley Hathaway '46 

Jokes Editor, Clifford Thayer '45 

Alumni Editor, Louise Newell '45 

Sports Editor, Neil Damon '45 

Exchange Editor, Barry Purrington '45 

Art Editor, Robert Dana '46 

Faculty Advisors, Mrs Henry Thornton and 

Mrs. Madeleine Brown 



CONTENTS 

Tattler Masthead 2 

Dedication 3 

Senior Class Pictures 4 

Graduation Program 8 

Class History 9 

Class Prophecy 11 

Class Will 13 

Class Grinds 14 

Class Statistics 16 

Faculty 17 

Junior Class 18 

Sophomore Class 19 

Freshman Class 20 

Editorials 21 

Literary 23 

Tattler Staff 28 

Review Staff 29 

Pro Merito 30 

Forensic Group 31 

Basketball 32 

Orchestra 33 

Alumni Notes 34 

Autographs 37 

Advertisements 39 



THE TATTLER 



1920 - 1945 




MR. LUCIUS A. MERRITT 



To "Vernie," our loyal friend 
and helper who has patiently 
borne with our shortcom- 
ings and rejoiced in our 
successes, we gratefully de- 
dicate this issue of the 
Tattler. 



To Mr. Merritt, we dedicate 
this issue of the Tattler in 
appreciation of the many 
years of loyal service and 
guidance he has given us. 




MR. VERNON G. WARNER 



THE TATTLER 




ELIZABETH MARY BATURA "Bette" 

"The best way to have friends is to be one." 

Prom Committee 3; Glee Club 1, 2; Basketball 1; Mins- 
trel 1; Victory Corps 2. 





RUTH EUNICE BEAN 



'Ruthie" 



"The measure of a man's life is the well spending 
of it not it's length." 

Glee Club 3. 4. 



MARY LOUISA BISBEE 



"Mary Lou" 



"If a task is once begun never leave it 'till it's done." 

Secretary 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Presi- 
dent 2, 4; Vice-President 3; Ass't Circulation Editor for 
the Ink Spot 2; Debating Team 3, 4; Declamation 3, 4; 
N. F. L. President 4; Westfield Student Congress 4; Pro 
Merito 3, 4; N. E. Junior Model Congress at A. I. C. 4; 
Alumni Editor Review 4; Victory Corps 2, 3; Junior Red 
Cross 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; DAR Citizen 4; 
Editor-in-Chief of Tattler 4; Ass't Editor of Tattler 3. 



NEIL FAIRFIELD DAMON "Nipper" 

"What you do still betters what is done." 

Captain of Basketball 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 
1, 2, 3; Track 1; Minstrel 1; Class President 1; Prom 
Committee 3; Student Council 1; Victory Corps 2, 3; 
Junior Red Cross 4; Sports Editor of the Tattler 4; 
Sports Editor of the Ink Spot 4; Debating 4. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




LORRAINE ELIZABETH JONES "Jonesie" 

"Variety is the spice of life." 
Victory Corps 2; Prom Committee 3: Secretary 3. 



RUTH ALICE LA CASSE "Ruthie" 

"Be ruled by time the wisest counsellor of all." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 2; Assistant Fea- 
ture Editor of the Ink Spot 3; Prom Committee 3. 



RITA JEANNETTE LUPIEN "Frenchy" 

"Good humor is always a good success" 

Minstrel 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Review Staff 4; Assist- 
ant Business Manager of the Tattler 4; Junior Red 
Cross 4; Victory Corps 2, 3; Prom Decorating Com- 
mittee 3. 



RUTH ELEANOR MOLLISON "Mollie" 

"A good name is better than riches." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Victory Corps 2; Prom 3; Debating 
4; Declamation 3, 4; A. I. C. Student Congress 4; West- 
field Student Congress 4; American League Oratical in 
Orange 4; Assistant Manager of the school paper 4; 
Assistant Business Manager of the Tattler 4; Class His- 
torian 4; Junior Red Cross 4; Pro Merito 4. 



THE TATTLER 




LOUISE BEATRICE NEWELL 

"Helping someone else is the secret of happiness." 

Minstrel 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Historian 2, 3; 
Victory Corps 2, 3; Assistant Alumni Editor of the Ink 
Spot 3; Assistant Literary Editor of the Tattler 3; 
National Forensic League 3, 4; Junior Prom 3; Class 
Secretary 4; Junior Red Cross 4; Business Manager of 
the Review 4; Alumni Editor of the Tattler; Westfield 
Student Congress; N. E. Junior Model Congress at 
A. I. C. 4; Secretary of N. F. L. 4. 



BARRY JAY PURRINGTON 

"Busy here and there." 



"Zip' 



Vice-President 1, 4; President 3; Treasurer 2; Glee Club 
2, 3, 4; Student Council 1; Ink Spot 2; Tattler 4; Prom 
3; Victory Corps 2, 3; Junior Red Cross 4. 



PHYLLIS RITA RHOADES 

"Plan for tomorrow, but act for today." 



"Phil" 



Minstrel 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Review Staff 4. 



EVA JANE SANDERSON 

"What is worth doing is worth doing well." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Victory Corps 2; Declamation and 
Debating 3, 4; Feature Editor of the School Paper 3; 
Editor-in-chief of the School Paper 4; Literary Editor 
of the Tattler 3; Business Manager of the Tattler 4 
Vice-President 2; Class Treasurer 3, 4; Pro Merito 3, 4 
Basketball 1; Minstrel 1; Orchestra 3, 4; Red Cross 4 
Student Congress at Westfield and Springfield 4. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




ANTOINETTE LUCILLE STEVENS 

"A merry heart goes all the day." 



"Betty' 



CLIFFORD MALCOLM THAYER "Tux" 

"A little nonsense now and then is 
relished by the best of men." 

Baseball 1, 2, 3; Basketball 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Debating 
4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Tattler Staff 3, 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 3. 




THE TATTLER 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 
CLASS HISTORIAN 



Mary Lou Bisbee 

Barry Purrington 

Louise Newell 

Eva Jane Sanderson 

Ruth Mollison 



GRADUATION NIGHT 



CLASS HISTORY 
CLASS PROPHECY 



Louise Newell 
Neil Damon 



(Read by Ruth LaCasse since Neil was called into 
the Navy and could not be present at graduation) 



CLASS GRINDS 
CLASS WILL 



Ruth Bean 
Lorraine Jones 



GRADUATION NIGHT ORATIONS 
Our Country in the Post-War World Eva Jane Sanderson 

The Community in the Post-War World Ruth Mollison 

Youth in the Post-War World Mary Lou Bisbee 

CLASS MOTTO — We Will Find a Path or Make One 
CLASS GIFT — $25 War Bond 
CLASS FLOWER — Red Rose 



SENIOR CLASS 



Elizabeth Batura 
Ruth Bean 
*Mary Lou Bisbee 
Neil Damon 
Lorraine Jones 
Ruth LaCasse 
Rita Lupien 



*Ruth Mollison 

Louise Newell 

Barry Purrington 

Phyllis Rhoades 

*Eva Jane Sanderson 

Betty Stevens 

Clifford Thayer 



*Pro Merito 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Class History 



It is the year of our Lord, February 17, 
1955. Fourteen of us are gathered in the 
Pink Elephant Room in the Hotel Bristol. 
Ten years have passed since we graduated 
from Williamsburg High. We have come 
back to New York City for a reunion of 
our class trip and also to settle a few 
problems that we left unfinished in 1945. 
Our President still, Mary Lou Bisbee calls 
the gathering together. She has in her 
hands a sealed paper which has been 
safely kept since it was written in May 
1945. We of the '45 class had agreed at 
that time that the History of Our Class 
should be kept a secret until after we had 
received our diplomas. Since ten years have 
elapsed we now know that it is safe to 
open these important papers telling what 
happened in the four years we were at 
school and also other important articles that 
we knew would be fatal to our class if they 
fell into the wrong hands. She gives this 
important document to our Secretary, 
Louise B. Newell. It reads as follows: 

"In the year of 1941, thirty-four bashful 
students walked slowly up the two flights 
of stairs. We went into the first door on 
our left; here we took seats. We didn't see 
much of the teachers or school that day as 
we only registered. The next day we again 
walked slowly up the stairs. This time 
most of us took seats in the back of the 
room. Mr. Mullaly, our home room teacher, 
looked us over and finally said, "You may 
keep the seats you have if you behave 
yourselves." Within the next two weeks 
most of us were down in the front two rows. 
Somehow or other we got through the first 
week of school. By either banging into or 
going into the wrong room we found out 
that our teachers' names were Miss Dun- 
phy, Principal, Miss Barrus, Miss Webber, 
Mr. Foster, Mr. Walker, and Mr. Mullaly. 

After two or three weeks the President 
of the Senior class came in to help us 
on our class meeting. We felt pretty proud 
of the officers for whom we voted. Neil 
Damon was our President, Barry Purring- 
ton, Vice-President, Mary Lou Bisbee, Sec- 



retary, Barbara Cone, Treasurer, and Al- 
bert Kopka. Class Historian. 

We were really getting into the swing 
of the school and beginning to let loose 
when bang— Freshmen Reception. We still 
don't know who to thank but we were 
saved from a full week of initiation. The 
order came from headquarters that it would 
be only one night, but Oh! what a night! 
On the whole the evening turned out fairly 
well, considering that none of us could 
dance too well. 

Being Freshmen we were kept down a 
bit, but a few of us were in Glee Club and 
we also had two representatives on the 
Student Council,— and I must not forget the 
Minstrel Show that some were in too. The 
year came to a close with many of our 
class gone. 

The summer seemed to go by a lot faster 
than we hoped and we found ourselves again 
going up the two flights of stairs. We were 
still looked down upon, but it wasn't half as 
bad as the first year. About three weeks 
after we started school we had our first 
class meeting for the year. That day as we 
began looking over our class to see who 
would be who, we realized that we dropped 
from a class of thirty-four to twenty-two. 
Our officers were changed that year. For 
President we voted, Mary Lou Bisbee, Vice- 
President, Eva Jane Sanderson, Secretary, 
Ruth LaCasse, Treasurer, Barry Purring- 
ton, Historian, Louise B. Newell. Most of 
us that year settled down to some really 
hard work, such as sweating over Geometry, 
French and Latin II. I don't believe that 
many of us skipped the office that year 
either if I remember rightly. I don't know 
how I did it, but I almost forgot the teach- 
ers. We had lost two of our teachers, Mr. 
Walker and Mr. Mullaly, to the army. Miss 
Merritt and Miss Lawe took their places. 
Miss Webber, Miss Barrus, Miss Dunphy 
and Mr. Foster were still there — to our 
relief, I think. 

We had to call off our class party because 
of the war and instead of the Student 
Council we started the Victory Corps. The 



10 



THE TATTLER 



school paper also started up again this year. 

We found again that the year had gone 
by very fast. Many were thankful, because 
I don't believe that we could have taken 
too much more of Geometry and Latin II. 

The summer passed as quickly as ever 
and we found ourselves back at school, but 
this time as upper classmen. It seemed as 
though our class enrollment was decreasing 
more and more. From twenty-two the year 
before we dropped to eighteen; mostly girls, 
too. Within two weeks we had elected our 
cla^s officers for the year, Barry Purring- 
ton, President, Mary Lou Bisbee, Vice-Pres- 
ident, Lorraine Jones, Secretary, Eva Jane 
Sanderson, Treasurer, and Louise B. Newell, 
Class Historian. 

It seems also that the school was having 
a terrible time keeping tea?hers. Miss 
McDermott and Miss Johnson took Miss 
Barrus' and Miss Lawe's places. Miss Mer- 
ritt also left that year. The WAVES took 
these three teachers. On the staff were still 
Miss Dunphy. Miss Webber, and Mr. Foster. 
Mrs. Smith also finished the year for Miss 
Johnson who left. 

We really started the ball rolling this 
year. Some member of our class was in 
every organization that was started or con- 
tinued from the year before. 

We held our first school party this year, 
too, and it came out very successfully. 
Also, for the first time in two years, we 
had a Junior Prom. The year came to a 
close soon for us, but I believe our home- 
room teacher, Miss Webber, was very, very 
thankful. 

The summer passed and the year had 
come that we were looking forward to. We 
were now dignified Seniors. Again our 
class had lost some members; this year the 
enrollment went from eighteen to fourteen. 
There were only three boys left now. The 
staff had two new teachers again. This 
time Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Thornton took 
Miss McDermott's and Mrs. Smith's places. 
Miss Dunphy, Miss Webber and Mr. Foster 
were still there. On the second day that we 
started school we found that our home-room 
teacher, Mrs. Brown who was new in school, 
had a beautiful seating plan worked out. 
We could tell by the way we were placed 



around the room who helped her out. Our 
officers this year were: President, Mary Lou 
Bisbee, Vice-president, Barry Purrington, 
Secretary, Louise Newell, Treasurer, Eva 
Jane Sanderson, Class Historian, Ruth Mol- 
lison. 

The first thing that we put on this year 
was Freshmen Reception — something all of 
us had been waiting for four years to do. 
I don't think that the Freshmen will forget 
the class of '45, although we were not too 
disagreeable to them. Right after this party 
we decided that we wanted to go on a class 
trip, so for the next few months we put 
on a card party, Christmas Party, dance, 
and a food sale. 

On February 17, 1945, twelve of us in- 
cluding Mr. and Mrs. Thornton left on the 
8:15 A. M. train for Xew York City— to the 
surprise of all the students and teachers in 
the school for this was the first class trip 
since '41. We arrived in New York about 
noon and went right to the Hotel Bristol. 
Here we were settled in our rooms, two 
rooms on the eleventh floor and two on the 
ninth. It was funny how our group of girls 
were put on the eleventh floor right across 
from our chaperones' room. That day we 
took a subway intending to go out to the 
Statue of Liberty, but by the time we got 
turned around and landed in Brooklyn and 
back on the right subway it was too late, 
so we took a ferry ride out to Staten Island 
instead. That night we saw "Life With 
Father." It would take too long to go into 
detail about everything we did or saw but 
we took in just about all the things we 
could in the four days we were there. In- 
cluded in this were the Empire State Build- 
ing, St. Patrick's Cathedral. Riverside 
Church, Museum of Natural History, Cen- 
tral Park, a radio show, about four movies, 
a hockey game, and a few of us even went 
to a Night Club. I suppose at this time we 
should at least mention the soldiers and 
sailors. I also bet the elevator man would 
have been glad to see us go, until we found 
the back stairs between the ninth and elev- 
enth floors. The frankforts and soda tasted 
good also. Well, after four days and nights 
of it we were all glad to go home. I believe 
Continued on page 36 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



11 



Class Prophecy 



It was the year 1965 in the city of Austin, 
Texas, and I had just come into town to do 
my Saturday night shopping. I owned a 
large sheep ranch just three miles to the 
south of that city. As I walked down the 
street I could hear in the distance the 
clatter of horses on the rough brick pave- 
ment and the crack of pistols whining in the 
air. Then as they came around the bend 
in the road I could see that there were five 
men on horse back yelling and shouting as 
they advanced. When they drew up to the 
hitching posts I could see that the two in 
front were no other than Clifford Thayer 
and Ruth Bean. Instantly I rushed forth 
and greated them with a hearty welcome. 
Both Tux and Ruthie had been working at a 
nearby ranch for some time and were now 
co-managers of the place. After chatting 
and talking about old times I proceeded on 
my journey to the near-by barber shop. 
When I entered I saw a huge sign hanging 
over the door. It read "Ye Old Purrington 
Shop." At once the thought dashed through 
my head, could this be Barry, my old class- 
mate? When I was well inside I saw a lean 
gray man bending over the barber chair 
and applying shaving soap to a gay-looking 
fellow crouched down so far that I could 
hardly see the hair of the man being shaved. 
I asked the barber if by any chance he was 
Mr. Purrington and he said he wasn't but 
the fellow in the chair was. Barry looked 
around and then gave the chair a half turn 
to get a look at me. After we had recog- 
nized each other and talked over old times 
back at Burgy, Barry told me that he had 
been in the barber business for 10 years and 
hoped he would be there ten years from that 
day. When Barry had finished shaving me 
I said "good-bye" and glided gently down 
the stone steps. Now I was beginning to 
feel a little hungry so I went to the new 
Polo Restaurant just opposite Barry's Bar- 
ber Shop. When I was seated a sweet little 
girl came up and asked for my order. I 
gave it to her and just as she was turning 
away I discovered it was Lorraine Jones. I 
whistled to her and she looked around with 
a sudden surprise. I found out that Lor- 



raine was married to a rich oil well owner 
and she worked there to take up her spare 
time. After eating a nice steak dinner I 
bade Lorraine "good-bye" and went out 
the door. 

Walking up the street, I saw a poster in 
a store window and it read "Betty Stevens 
and Louise Newell starring in the world 
famous play 'Now and Then', at the Jones 
Theater." Why! these must be my old 
classmates and I must see them. When I 
was going in the theater a huge crowd of 
people was pushing and shoving to get good 
seats for the play. I went to the ticket 
office and was about to buy my ticket when 
I saw the person selling them was none 
other than Eva Sanderson. We couldn't talk 
much because there were so many people 
wanting tickets. However, Eva had been 
working there for about three years and 
was very happy because she wanted to be 
near Betty and Louise. When I was seated 
and quite comfortable I kept feeling this 
constant trickle of soda down my back. I 
turned around and found Rita Lupien. We 
said "hello," but in order not to cause too 
much of a disturbance we said no more and 
Rita took out a little pad and pencil and 
jotted down a few lines telling what she 
was doing and how she happened to be 
there. She had been on a trip around the 
world and happened to pass through Texas. 
That night she had seen the posters in the 
stores and she just had to see her old class- 
mates. 

At last the play was over and I, feeling 
a bit tired, decided to go to the park for a 
while where I might have a little peace and 
quiet. While I was walking toward the 
park I saw three objects jump out of an 
extremely high building and come zooming 
headlong toward the street. As they were 
about to be dashed against the pavement, 
three huge white things sprang from their 
backs and they floated with ease to the very 
spot where I was standing. I looked at the 
three with a look of amazement and found 
it to be no other than Phyllis Rhoades, 
Mary Lou Bisbee and Ruth LaCasse. I 
shook hands and then they told me that 



12 



THE TATTLER 



these were the new low altitude parachutes, 
which they made ten million dollars on. 
They told me that they had been in the 
experimental business for nearly eight years 
now and were giving all their proceeds to 
the old age society. 

Now I had had a full evening of it and 
had seen all my old classmates from 
Burgy High except Ruth Mollison. Why 
Ruth Mollison, she must be somewhere 
around but I couldn't seem to locate her, so 
I hopped into my 1964 Packard and headed 
for home. When I was about half way or 
maybe two-thirds of the way home I came 
across a car on the side of the road. It 
was a handsome piece of machinery (about 
a twenty-nine I should say) but nobody 
seemed to be around. After stopping and 



looking around I found no one to be there, 
and so I continued on my journey. On 
reaching the ranch I drove my car into the 
garage, went into the house and who 
should I find in my study but Ruth Mollison. 
We shook hands and then Ruthie told me 
that she had had motor trouble on the road 
and, finding no man around the ranch, de- 
cided to come in and make herself at home. 
Ruthie was visiting her class-mates and I 
was the first one she had come across. I 
showed her to her room and told her just 
to ignore any wolves that came jumping at 
the window. 

Feeling quite fortunate that I had seen 
all my old classmates, I retired to my 
chamber for a good night's sleep. 

NEIL DAMON '45 



CLASS HISTORY 

Continued from page 10 



that most of us slept the clock around the 
day after we came home. 

About two months later, we found that 
our class was financially embarrassed, so 
we put on a May-Day dance. This was the 
last major event until we graduated in 
June 21, 1945." 

After reading this important document 
we know that everyone who overheard it 
will understand why we of the class of '45 
felt it would be better to wait ten years 
before we opened it. 

LOUISE B. NEWELL '45. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



I* 



Class Will 



The Class of 1945 takes great pleasure 
in presenting to you tonight, our last will 
and testament. We are about to leave 
Williamsburg High School, but before leav- 
ing we should like to bequeath our treas- 
ures, and most precious possessions. 

To the faculty as a whole we leave our 
sincere thanks for having tried to teach 
us in the past four years. 

To Mr. Merritt we leave a sound proof 
office, so that he won't be disturbed by the 
noises coming from rooms four and five. 

To Miss Dunphy we leave some "C" gas 
coupons, so that she may drive her own car 
to school instead of taking busses. 

To Mr. Foster we leave some chains 
to chain the erasers to the blackboards, so 
that his next year's Freshman Class won't 
be able to throw them around. 

To Miss Webber we leave a car of her 
own, to continue her driving lessons with- 
out any worry of wrecking anyone else's 
car. 

To Mrs. Brown, we leave a watch with a 
second hand for her Stenography and Typ- 
ing Classes, so that she won't have to be 
borrowing one from her pupils. 

To Mrs. Thornton, we leave the honor of 
chaperoning our class on our class reunion 
in New York in 1955. (Never mind, Mrs. 
Thornton, we'll be ten years older.) 

We bequeath to anyone in the Junior 
Class, who thinks that they can fill the job, 
as well as Mary Lou Bisbee has, the honor 
of Senior Class President. 

To Raymond Hathaway and Frank Col- 
lins, Louise Newell leaves her dancing 

ability. 

Neil Damon and Clifford Thayer leave 
their frequent trips to Amherst and North- 
ampton, to anyone who thinks he could 
make these trips as often as they did. 

To Bernice Miller, Rita Lupien leaves 
her ready laughter, Rita thinks that Bern- 
ice is altogether too serious. 



Betty Batura leaves her knowledge of 
Bookkeeping to Ronald Beattie. We hope 
he can get by as well as Betty did without 
ever doing her assignments. 

Ruth Mollison leaves her frequent trips 
on the Greyhound buses, to Hattie Clark. 
Ruth hopes Hattie gets to know the bus 
drivers as well as she has. 

Ruth Bean leaves her love of traveling 
to Walter Demerski. She hears that he gets 
around. 

To Eugene Shay, Barry Purrington leaves 
his quiet gentlemanly ways. We hope Eu- 
gene takes advantage of these. 

Ruth LaCasse leaves her shyness to 
Eleanor Barron and Connie Baj. 

Phyllis Rhoades leaves her job at Grants 
to anyone who can skip work as often as 
she does, and still keep her job. 

Eva Jane Sanderson leaves her musical 
ability to Roger LaCourse and Leo LaCasse, 
so that the orchestra may continue in years 
to come. 

Bette Stevens leaves her seat in the Sen- 
ior Room to Alice Golash, in the hope that 
she will fill it more often than Bette did. 

And, last of all, we leave loads of amuse- 
ments for the coming year, so that this 
year's Juniors won't have too much time in 
which to mourn over the loss of their dear- 
est friends, the Seniors! 

In testimony, therefore, we hereunto set 
our hands and seal in the presence of these 
witnesses and declare this to be our last 
will and testament, this twenty-first day 
of June, in the year one thousand, nine 
hundred and forty-five. 

Witnesses: 

VAN JOHNSON 
SUNNY TUFTS 
LON MacALLISTER 

LORRAINE JONES, 
Class of '45. 



14 



THE TATTLER 



Class Grinds 



To graduate from "Burgy" High 

We found we had to toil. 

Before exams we crammed and crammed 

And burned the midnight oil. 

Each year we moved a little nearer 
To the Senior room — room 1. 
But now we're taking one more step, 
Our high school days are done. 

In number we are just fourteen, 
Each is the other's friend — 
We've been one happy family 
And hate to see it end. 

Now Mary Lou, our guardian, 
Has well presided o'er us. 
"Oh, Mary Lou! What shall we do!" 
Has always been our chorus. 

Eva Jane holds our purse strings, 
She's done the job real well, 
An accountant she aspires to be, 
But only time will tell. 

Tux Thayer is our problem child. 
No need to ask us why. 
Tux has such witty comebacks 
The teachers all just sigh. 

Ruth LaCasse is silent 
But her rights she will defend. 
Her studying is always done, 
On that you can depend. 

A cute little girl is Rita; 
She always wears a smile. 
She'd love to just raise horses 
Out where the west is wild. 

Neil's forever a happy lad 
With nautical interests galore. 
The seven seas his home will be 
As he sails from shore to shore. 



Always ready to help a friend 
Is our own dear Louise, 
Never too busy to wear a smile 
And she's always fun to tease. 

Phyllis is a jolly person 

Always full of fun. 

Though busy always — night and day 

Her shorthand doesn't get done. 

Barry is the chemist 

Of our little family. 

He mixes up all sorts of smells 

In the lab from nine till three. 

Lorraine is another problem child. 
She always keeps us guessing. 
But we understand it's the Navy 
That receives her final blessing. 

Betty Stevens came this year — 
A new branch on our family tree. 
Her heart's already claimed it's clear 
By the Merchant Marine. 

Ruth Mollison from Goshen comes 
Each day upon the bus. 
It isn't hard to please her — 
We never hear her fuss. 

This brings us to Betty Batura 
The one in our class who's most quiet — 
'Though she doesn't say much, it isn't hard 
To get her to smile. Just try it. 

That takes in all our family 
There's not much left to tell, 
And time is marching on you see, 
So it's time to say "Farewell." 

Farewell to dear old "Burgy" High 
Farewell to teachers, too. 
We've all had fun together, 
But now Farewell, from us to you. 

RUTH BEAN '45. 



In the days of our youth 




Identification page 36 



16 



THE TATTLER 



Class Statistics 

Prettiest Girl . . . Mary Lou Bisbee Student Most Likely 

Handsomest Boy .... Neil Damon to Succeed . . . Mary Lou Bisbee 

Most Popular Girl . Eva Jane Sanderson Class Wit Clifford Thayer 

Most Popular Boy .... Neil Damon Jolliest Student .... Louise Newell 

Best Girl Dancer .... Louise Newell Most Bashful Student . . Ruth LaCasse 

Best Boy Dancer .... Neil Damon Most Business-Like 

Best Dressed Girl . . . Lorraine Jones Student Betty Stevens 

Best Dressed Boy . . . Clifford Thayer Most Sophisticated 

Noisiest Student . . . Clifford Thayer Student .... Phyllis Rhoades 

Quietest Student .... Betty Batura Class Orator Ruth Mollison 

Smartest Student . . . Mary Lou Bisbee Favorite Sport Basketball 

„ ..,-,,„,, „ , Favorite Subject Shorthand 

Best All-Round Student . . Ruth Bean „ . ~ .-, 

Favorite Actress . . . Greer Garson 

Class Musicians . . Eva Jane Sanderson, Favorite Actor . . . Humphrey Bogart 

Clifford Thayer, Mary Lou Bisbee Favorite Orchestra .... Harry James 

Cutest Girl Rita Lupien Age Seventeen 

Cutest Boy Barry Purrington Mascots . . "Oscar" and "Sonny Boy" 



Song Review 

Let's take the long way home Barry and Lizzie 

A little on the lonely side Bette Stevens 

I'll be seeing you Ruth Bowker 

Sleigh Ride in July Lorraine Jones 

Whispering Study Periods 

The very thought of you Diplomas 

Together Neil and Donna 

How many hearts have you broken Eddie Lezynski 

Pretty Kitty Blue Eyes Phyllis Rhoades 

I'll get by Class of "45" 

This is a lovely way to spend an evening Junior Prom 

Beautiful Dreamers Class of "48" 

Strange Music Orchestra 

Good-night wherever you are Mrs. Brown 

Into each life some rain must fall ...... ... Warning Cards 

I wish we didn't have to say good-bye Class of "45" 

I Dream of you Miss Webber 

Long ago and far away Our Freshman year 

How many times do I have to tell you Mrs. Thornton 

It could happen to you Graduation 

Take it Easy Mr. Foster 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



17 




The Faculty 



Mr. Edward Foster 






Mrs. Howard Brown 



Miss Anne Dunphy 




Mrs. Henry Thornton 



Miss Helena Webber 



18 



THE TATTLER 




First Row: Alice Golash, Theodora Harlow, Sue Crone, Helen Sylvester, Edward 

Lezynski, Ruth Bowker, Shirley Hathaway, Cora Warner. 
Second Row: Betty Kulash, Felix Brisbois, Marshall Warner, Bob Dana, Morris 

Healy, Russell Loomis, Hattie Clark. 



Junior Class 



PRESIDENT, Edward Lezynski 
VICE-PRESIDENT, Ruth Bowker 



SECRETARY-AREASURER, Sue Crone 
HISTORIAN. Helen Sylvester 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



19 




First Row: Helen Clark, Shirley Payne, Rosalie Ice, Dorothy Carver, Betty Brooks, 
Donald Bates, Doris Graves, Elizabeth Yates, Barbara Dymerski, Harriet Ice. 

Second Row: Frederic Oliver, David LeDuc, Frank Collins, Doris Montgomery, Row- 
ena Nye, Janet Hillenbrand, Floyd Merritt, Walter Nye, Roscoe Liebenow. 



Sophomore Class 



PRESIDENT, Doris Graves 
VICE-PRESIDENT, Betty Brooks 



SECRETARY-TREASURER, Donald Bates 
HISTORIAN, Georgene Harry 



20 



THE TATTLER 




First Row: Constance Baj, Laura Lloyd, Virginia Dodge, Barbara Outhuse, Marilyn 
Williams, Ronald Beattie, Russell Warner, Walter Lesure, Robert Collins, Shirley 
Shumway, Shirley Nichols, Ruth Wells, May Sanderson, Eleanor Barron. 
Second Row: Robert Smith, Eugene Shay, Roger LaCourse, June Demerski, Viola 
Fraser, Rose Swinington, Palma Ingellis, Leo LaCasse, Raymond Hathaway, Joseph 
Myrtel, Robert Durbin. 



Freshman Class 



PRESIDENT, 



Robert Collins VICE-PRESIDENT, Russell Warner 

TREASURER, Walter Lesure 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



21 



Editorial 



LET FREEDOM RING 

My country 'tis of thee, 
Sweet land of liberty, 
Of thee I sing, 
Land where my fathers died! 
Land of the pilgrim's pride! 
From every mountainside 
Let freedom ring. 
* * * 

It was April 1, 1945 — Easter Sunday. 
The sky was a pretty blue, not an airplane 
in sight to remind us of the war that was 
wrecking the world. On the main highway, 
cars were rolling along — seemingly mind- 
less of the gasoline shortage. The grass 
was green — not filled with bomb craters 
like the fertile soil in France and China. 
The trees were standing erect, their 
branches budded — not lying on the ground, 
shattered by machine gun bullets or burned 
by incendiaries. We had had chicken for 
dinner — a feast compared to some of the 
food people were getting in other countries. 

Yet I knew, as I sat there, that some- 
where in Germany, regardless of the fact 
that it was Sunday, men were fighting — 
fighting hard for the things that they be- 
lieved to be right — to close the walls about 
Hitler and his Nazis. In England, lights 
were dimmed and windows blacked out — 
the people waiting tensely for air raids or 
buzz bombs. In some of the Pacific Islands, 
men sat in foxholes — watching the sky, on 
the alert for little yellow men who might 
jump from the dense jungle with long 
bayonets and grenades in their hands at 
any time. In China, the Japs were killing 
men, women, and children who had next to 
nothing with which to defend themselves. 
The underground was risking its life to 
relay messages which would help destroy 
the enemy all over the world. 

At home, I knew that people were work- 
ing harder and longer hours to put out the 
ammunition so badly needed in the front 
lines. More ships than ever before were 
being built. On western farms, fields were 
being plowed for spring planting — vegetable 
gardens being sowed. On huge ranches, 
cattle were driven off to the plains to fatten 



for meat to supply our country and refugees 
abroad. Grain mills were overworked. 

As I sat there, the church bells began 
to ring. I saw a few people stop to listen 
a minute, then go on — joining the scores of 
cars on the road. They had work to do. 
They were working for a bigger and better 
democracy, for everlasting peace, for a free 
world. With every clang of a hammer, 
every shot of a gun, every whistle of a 
bomb, you could hear the sounds of free- 
dom. 

Let freedom ring. 

SHIRLEY HATHAWAY '46. 



WE WILL FIND A PATH OR 
MAKE ONE 

Little did we realize that day the signifi- 
cance of those words, "We will find a path 
or make one." It was just a case of decid- 
ing on something which would be timely 
and suitable to the class. No one really 
felt enthusiastic over the idea; it was sim- 
ply necessary to get together on one single 
motto. As the class drew near to a close 
we decided on the eight brief words in the 
title above. 

In the crowds of New York we first real- 
fzed the necessity of finding a path or mak- 
ing one. The streets were jammed with 
people and it was imperative to push your 
way through or not go at all. It was a 
struggle to keep together and to reach the 
other side of the mob. 

Those crowds of people can be likened 
to the congested conditions of the world 
today. Everything is in turmoil. Countries 
and people are torn by the strife and 
struggles of war. A state of uncertainty 
and that of the unknown pervades the lands. 
The future is faced with a feeling of grim 
reality. Into this world are going hundreds 
of American youth like ourselves. Youth 
with dreams, ambitions, and ideals torn 
asunder by the stark reality of war. Some 
will fall unable to rise up against the odds. 
Others will remain undaunted ever going 
forward. It is upon these people that the 
world will depend. 



22 



THE TATTLER 



Who are these young people who are to 
carry or. their tasks without turning back 
even though the way be dark? They are 
those who can follow courageously and tri- 
umphantly the gains of others — making new 
gains of their own, those who have a goal 
set before them to which they can work 
their way, and those with unfailing per- 
severance. 

Over sixty years ago in Alabama there 
was a little girl who lost both sight and 
hearing due to a serious illness before she 
was two years old. For years her power 
of speech lay dormant. Surely there 
seemed no path in life open to her. Yet 
with the help of her teacher she learned the 
deaf and dumb language by touch, learned 
to read by feeling raised points which rep- 
resented letters, and finally learned to talk. 
She mastered French and German as well 
as English. She attended school and in 
1904 was graduated with honors from Rad- 
cliffe College. 

No path was easily available to Helen 
Keller yet she found a path and became a 
well-known author, lecturer, traveler, and 
helper of the blind. At the present she is 
helping and encouraging servicemen handi- 
capped in the war. 

The future may be dark and uncertain. 
There may not be any apparent path for us 
to follow, yet with the health, education, 
and determination that we have, we too 
can make our path for a successful and 
full life. 

MARY LOU BISBEE '45. 



OPPORTUNITY AHEAD 

We are just about to realize the many 
wonderful opportunities which have passed 
by us — the many chances to advance our 
education and increase our knowledge. Let 
us profit by our mistakes and make the 
most of our future. Can we afford to con- 
tinue as we have been? Are we going to 
sleep right through everything and not 
wake up until it is too late? Let us take 
advantage of what is to come and gain a 
place for ourselves in this country. 

Everyone has an equal chance. To go to 
college is the next opportunity for us. Are 
we passing this by, also ? Few people can 
not afford to go to college and those who 
have any interest or ambition should in- 
vestigate scholarships before they decide 
that they can not finance such an under- 
taking. 

That "Golden Opportunity" of eight years 
of grammar school preparation and four 
years of high school education for us has 
passed and we have one more chance for 
advancement to make the most of. We must 
do something about it! Wake up and do not 
make the same error again. Make the most 
of our future by attending college, which 
is, in most cases the last opportunity for 
formal education to increase your know- 
ledge. 

EVA JANE SANDERSON '45. 




WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



Literary 



'SO YOUNG TO DIE' 



This was the third cold dark night that I 
had spent sitting- under a broken tree 
beside him. It was about twelve degrees 
below zero and I took off my overcoat so 
he could have it. Here I was sitting and 
thinking — thinking; no sounds but the 
groans of his voice. Looking down upon 
him, I remembered the first time we had 
met. I'd called him "Squirt," because he 
was so small and looked so young. We had 
been together since then. Four nights ago 
the Germans had come over — we were now 
separated from our platoon. I could see 
search lights playing in the sky now. They 
were trying to pick up the airplanes that 
I could hear in the distance. The planes 
came closer and closer — finally the whistling 
of the bombs. In a few minutes it was all 
over and then there was just the sound of 
the fading planes. Again I looked down at 
him. He was bleeding badly now, as if it had 
just started. He moved a little and his 
eyes opened. I could almost feel his young 
blue eyes penetrating through me. He mur- 
murred something I did not hear — then as 
if it were a miracle, he spoke as clearly 
as ever. 

"Jim, is it very bad?" 

"Somewhat." 

"Do you think there is any chance?" 

"I don't know." 

"Will you do me a favor when you 
get back home?" 

"Sure." 

"Look up Mother and Dad for me?" 

"Sure." 

"Another thing, there's a girl named, 
Mary, on Maple Street — give her my army 
ring, will you?" 

"Sure." 

"Thanks. How long do you think I will 
last?" 

"Don't know, Squirt." 

"Do you know, Jim, I am not scared any 
more. You see I am eighteen today." 

His head fell back on my shoulder then. 
I must have sat that way for hours. All I 
remember is two men taking him out of 



my arms and then putting me on a 
stretcher. 

Two weeks later I came to enough to 
know I was in a hospital in England. I was 
going home — you see my right arm was 
gone. They told me that he was buried in 
France. I had a lot of time to think and I 
did; about him mostly, and the days in 
France — the way he looked, the things he 
said — little things — big things. The one 
thing that kept going through my mind was 
eighteen, eighteen — so young to die. 

LOUISE B. NEWELL '45. 



MILLARD, THE MALLARD 

As the sun set with its enchanting charm 
over the mountains, it cast a beautiful 
pattern of color on the glassy surface of 
Lake Evergreen. A lone duck quietly and 
methodically flew his way over those moun- 
tains and slowly, evenly let himself down, 
down onto the cool and refreshing waters 
of the remote lake. 

He quickly scanned the still, calm sur- 
face of the lake to see if any other duck 
was there. After this cautious but clever 
duck, who went by the name of Millard, 
had assured himself that he was alone, he 
swam in toward the western shore of the 
lake which was to be the scene of much 
activity in the future. But he did not think 
of anything of that sort; he did not even 
care much; all he wanted to do now was to 
eat and this he started to do in earnest. 

After an hour or so his hunger was 
satisfied and he began to think of a sleep- 
ing place. He found one at last and went 
to sleep in this customary fashion on one 
foot and with his head under a wing. As 
he slept through the starlit night, he 
dreamed. No one really knows if ducks can 
dream, but Millard did. He dreamed he was 
on that very same Lake Evergreen, but that 
he had a mate. He was a very happy duck 
in his dream because he had a mate, and 
she had fourteen little ducklings. He was 
very proud and loved his mate endlessly. 
After a while the wind humming through 
the pines overhead awoke him and he stood 



24 



THE TATTLER 



still for a moment, until he realized it was 
the approaching dawn that made the atmo- 
sphere so pale and white. 

Somehow Millard could not forget the 
pleasing qualities of his dream, so after he 
had eaten some berries, wild ri:e, and other 
bits of food, he set out along the shores 
of beautiful Lake Evergreen to find the 
loving mate of whom he had dreamed. 
While he hopefully plowed through the 
waters, the sun lifted above the horizon 
and sent its warm rays across the cloud- 
less sky onto the chilly surface of the lake. 
While he continued his search around the 
lake, calling, looking for his dream duck, 
the day wore on into the afternoon and 
he again longed to fly and search for other 
ducks. 

As he was rearranging his feathers, his 
keen eye spotted a flight of ducks shaped 
like a giant V high up in the sky. Millard 
happily, but unconsciously quacked to him- 
self and stretched his neck out and looked 
up. He was ready to fly up to join them 
when he noticed an alteration in their 
course and they came down to land on the 
other side of the lake. Millard was so 
happy that it seemed as though he could 
not swim fast enough to meet the 
newcomers. As he neared them, they called 
to him and he glowed as he suddenly re- 
membered his yearning for a mate. 

He swam in among the group of about 
fifty ducks and looked eagerly for the duck 
he had dreamed about only the night 
before. At first he saw no familiar faces, 
but as he mixed in the group more, he no- 
ticed a drake's face that struck a familiar 
note in his mind. He was mystified to an 
extent, and he tried to recollect just when 
he had seen it before. He saw that the 
drake was strong and quick, but rather an 
old bird, still capable of putting up a good 
fight if need be. Millard thought he had 
seen this strange yet familiar drake some 
place, some time, but he could not think 
where. He tried to remember where he had 
been with other ducks. Then he remem- 
bered and he knew who it was. 

This handsome drake was one of his old 
enemies. Millard had seen him kill two of 
his best friends. He was generally hated 



by even.- duck that knew him. but no one 
dared to challenge him to a fight. He hated 
the big drake as much as the others did, 
but he had never had a real reason to fight 
him. Now Millard was. indeed, quite a strong 
duck himself. He was four years old and 
had led a flight of ducks and was rather ex- 
perienced; but soon he forgot about the big 
drake. 

Millard's thoughts now turned back to 
the prospects of a mate. He resumed look- 
ing and shortly he saw a young duck who 
resembled the one in his dream. He was 
very happy and wanted to meet her. but 
his better judgment told him not to be- 
cause the group had not known him very 
long. As the next few days passed on the 
peaceful lake, Millard became more and 
more fond of the young duck he had seen. 
Finally he nerved himself to approach her 
and meet her. She had a nice personality 
and Millard thought she liked him. They 
went off a short distance while they were 
eating and she told him about the big drake 
and how they all hated him even though 
he was their leader. She also told him that 
the big drake liked her very much but she 
could not do anything about it. Then Mil- 
lard realized that if he were to have this 
pretty young duck for a mate, he would 
have real competition. He didn't crave 
fights, but the thought of one entered his 
mind and troubled him. He was sure of one 
thing, and that was that he wanted the 
young duck for his mate. With instinct not 
understood by man. Millard made up his 
mind that he must fight the big drake to 
the finish! 

Xieht was nearing now and Millard 
wanted to fight him at night. Later, as the 
full moon rose, he slipped silently along the 
lake's shore in search of his quarry. Sud- 
denly a shape splashed into the water be- 
side him and he felt a sharp jab at his 
head. The fight began! Millard moved 
away from the shore where the other ducks 
watched. The fight was very even for a 
while until the big drake got on top of 
Millard and held his head under water. 
Millard thought fast and dove deep down 
into the water, eluding the big drake and 
appearing behind him. Millard jumped at 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



25 



him with the assurance that all who 
watched were on his side. Again and again 
he pecked at the big drake's head and then 
he got on top of him. He forced the big 
drake, who was now quite weak, under the 
water victoriously and became the leader 
of the flight. He was tired but very happy 
because now he could fulfill his big desire 
— to have a mate all his own. 

FRANK COLLINS '47. 



HIS FLAG 

The old man rises early every day in 
time to see the sun peep through the pine 
trees. Soon after the sun's appearance the 
man can be seen each mrning walking to- 
ward the white flagpole that stands on his 
lawn. The high spot in his day is the 
moment the large American flag reaches 
the top of the pole where it is caught by 
the early breeze and flung wide. 

Though eighty-five years of toil have left 
their mark on the man, he stands a little 
straighter and his eyes shine a little 
brighter whenever he looks at the stars 
and stripes waving over his land. There is 
hardly a spot on his farm from which the 
flag is not visible — a symbol of encourage- 
ment to the workers in the field. 

The flag has flown thus for many years, 
but never more proudly than now. The 
aged farmer finds comfort and reassurance 
in its presence; his sons gain strength to 
work longer and harder hours; his grand- 
sons on the battlefields remember that at 
home their work is being done well; his 
great-grandson, carrying a wounded sol- 
dier in Germany, watches his patient's pain- 
filled face — but even there a vision comes 
of the stars and stripes flying proudly over 
a spot dear to him in New England and 
he is made strong. 

Each day at sundown the old man slowly 
lowers the flag and in the hearts of four 
generations is the satisfaction of another 
day well lived and hope of the peace to 
come. 

ANONYMOUS. 



"HEAVEN U.S.A. 

It was wonderfully clear on D Day plus 
five. Yet the job "Flight 13" had to do 



didn't match the day. I could see "Clev- 
er's" bright red Mustang, with Bill's 
khaki on the "two step" below. Dune and 
I provided the top cover as we cruised 
along. 

I stared out at the words "Dymanite" 
on the side of my ship; then I looked down 
entranced by the emerald peninsula called 
Normandy, which like a gem surmounted 
by the aquamarine of the channel, glistened 
below. 

I was snapped out of my dream as enemy 
fighters flashed down from the sun. I 
pushed the stick forward — throttle wide, 
left pedal to the floor, I spun dizzily to the 
earth. I pulled out swiftly at "Rhubarb" 
height and went flickering down the wind- 
ing valleys. I went for two miles at tree- 
top level with four dark sinister-looking 
Focke-Wulfs hovering behind me. 

Suddenly I pulled the stick back, jammed 
hard right rudder, and with wide open 
throttle, my "Dynamite" roared her defi- 
ance and her bid for freedom. 

She was still shuddering when I leveled 
off at ten thousand and pointed her nose 
again toward the earth. 

As I watched the hairs of my sight, a 
black fuselage flitted into the cross-hairs, 
I kept it there. 

With set jaw I pressed the gun-button 
— flaming ribbons went swirling down into 
the cockpit — then it fell to pieces. 

As I pulled out, the other three "heinies" 
piled in for a kill. "Dynamite" shuddered 
under the crashing slugs from the three. 

The plexi-glass canopy shattered as slugs 
came tearing into the cockpit. My legs and 
arms bled profusely. "I must get away." I 
sent "Dynamite" into a spin. When we fell 
into a low ceiling cloud, we leveled off and 
roared for England. 

My numbed brain could only wonder: 
"Dune and the gang — where were they?" 
"Would Barbara, the girl at Control Blue 
Rim guide me in?" 

I tried vainly to open "Greenhouse" but 
it was jammed. 

I sat weakly back in the cockpit and as 
I saw the chalk cliffs of Dover, I managed 
to smile. Almost home! 

I buzzed the landing field on the coast. 



26 



THE TATTLER 



Barbara's voice came coolly over the inter- 
phone "Blue Rim to Dynamite, Blue Rim 
to Dynamite over." 

"Dynamite to Blue Rim, one mile east 
west at 5000, wounded, field directions, 
over." 

"Blue Rim to Dynamite, number three 
runway clear, take it easy. Here's the 
beam." 

I roared over the field, the clear whine 
of the beam guided me down. I released the 
landing gear. I listened for the click, but 
it didn't come. Glancing at the dash I saw 
half-red — half-green light, the landing 
gear was jammed half-way. I zoomed over 
the tower just clearing the trees. Looking 
down at the heavily populated English 
country-side, I knew I couldn't crash-land 
there. People below waved up at me as I 
headed Dynamite back over the Channel. 
There were two fishing boats about 1000 
yards off shore. Again I tried to open the 
Greenhouse, this time I managed to open it 
enough to squeeze my small body through. 
Setting the automatic pilot, I released my 
safety belt and tried to climb through, but 
I couldn't get out with my parachute on. I 
fell weakly back into the cockpit. 

Banking left, I flew over the boats again. 
I turned Dynamite over on her back. I 
couldn't see clearly, my arms and legs 
ached terribly; I slid through the opening, 
and using every ounce of strength in my 
body moved the canopy back and fell free 
of my trap. As I pulled the rip-cord I slid 
into blackness. 

The cold channel waters failed to wake 
me. However, when I awoke at the fishing 
port I asked weakly, "Where am I?" 

A smooth English voice said, "New 
Jersey. 

"Heaven?" I asked. 

I came from New Jersey, U. S. A. 

ROBERT DANA '46. 



THE U33 

The midnight watch had just started 
when the forward lookout of the destroyer, 
Sam Grey saw a low, dark object floating 
on the water two points off the starboard 
bow. Immediately the "Man your battle 
stations" call sounded throughout the ship 



and the sleepy sailors ran to their stations. 
Gun covers were removed and ammunition 
cases opened. The guns came to bear on the 
object and the powerful search light illu- 
minated it for an instant and then snapped 
off, for the object was an United States life 
raft. The water was churned into foam for 
a moment as the engines of the destroyer 
ran full speed astern and stopped the ship 
a few feet from the raft. Then there was a 
slight bump as the raft drifted against the 
hull. Ropes were made fast and the men 
helped on deck. The raft was then turned 
loose and destroyed with a shot from the 
guns on the destroyer. Many hours later 
the captain of the destroyer learned this 
story from one of the men from the raft. 

The U33 had been built with her three 
sister ships in the late fall of the year 1940. 
After her shake-down cruise she was as- 
signed to Captain Rogers and sent to the 
Pacific Ocean by way of the Panama Canal. 
For three years she sailed the Chinese coast 
from Pakoi in the south to Chinkai in the 
north. A tanker here, a troopship there. So 
the story went. By 1943 her total number of 
ships sunk had been raised to well over a 
hundred. On the twenty-second of January 
she was sailing eastward five hundred miles 
north of Luzon. It was an hour before 
sunrise when the sound detectors picked 
up the sound of many heavy engines sail- 
ing southward. Rising to periscope depth 
she saw one battleship, two heavy cruisers, 
one aircraft carrier and six destroyers 
steaming under forced draft. Ordering full 
speed ahead the captain made ready to fire 
two torpedoes. Then as the distance closed 
he gave the order "Fire one, fire two." As 
the two sped on their way he stopped both 
engines and ordered full dive on her diving 
planes. Even as the sub glided down into 
the murky depths two dull explosions were 
heard, followed by one large, and the crew 
added a battleship to their score. Immedi- 
ately depth charges began to drop back 
where they had just been. Slowly they 
moved away. Then it came, the sub rocked 
crazily as an explosion sounded just out- 
side the hull. All the lights went out for 
an instant, but in a minute the blue emer- 
gency lights came on. As the men got to 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



27 



their feet the sound of rushing water was 
heard through the ship. Quickly the stern 
compartment was shut off with water-tight 
bulkheads. But instead of setting out for 
home port she started southward after the 
Jap ships. As she went south she made 
emergency repairs on her hull so that on 
the fourth day she was able to resume full 
speed. A week later as the sub surfaced to 
recharge her batteries at night she spotted 
the same Jap force minus a battleship. They 
were lying at anchor bunched together in 
Tablas Strait. Quickly closing for the kill 
the sub fired four torpedoes into the closely 
packed bunch of ships and then let loose 
with two more at those ships that were 
missed in the first attack. The first four 
torpedoes hit the two cruisers and the last 
two hit the carrier and one destroyer. A 
flight of Zeros were just taking off when 
the torpedo struck and one of them smashed 
into the superstructure of one of the de- 



stroyers. The rest landed in the sea. By 
now the sub was well on her way from 
there in the resulting confusion. Happily 
they set sail for home, out of torpedoes 
and low on fuel and food. Six days out of 
home base they were charging their bat- 
teries one night when they spotted a long, 
dark shape running on a parallel course. 
Snapping on their search light they saw 
the conning tower of a Jap sub. Ordering 
full speed ahead, the captain headed on a 
course that would bring the sub to a posi- 
tion where it could ram the Jap sub. By 
this time the enemy had opened up on 
the sub with its deck gun and the two subs 
shot it out as the U33 rammed deep into 
the Jap hull blowing the bow off U33. Her 
crew barely had time to launch the raft 
before she sank. They had drifted three 
days before the destroyer sighted them. 

JOSEPH MYRTEL '48. 



TOMORROW 

The birds, the sun, the moon, the stars, 
Look down on a world of tomorrow. 

The boys in all our Armed Services are 
dying. 

The boys and girls at home are fighting too, 

Only in another way. 

Through all this there is one ray of light — 

The men and women of tomorrow. 

Those who are the graduates of today will b e 

Roosevelts, Deweys, farmers, manufac- 
turers ; 

Secretaries, housewives, mothers and 
fathers, 

Tomorrow — 



GRADUATES 

The golden sun peeking at our flustered 

graduates 
Slowly sinks behind the horizon. 

The rising moon sees these same young 

people 
Minus their flusters, 
Trying to act like the adults they have 

just become. 
Some grew up when they received their 

diplomas, 
Others will wait until the near future. 
Only nature knows the true thoughts of 

these 
Young people. 



The young men and women of today are 

planning 
For tomorrow. 

They will also plan for the tomorrow after 
tomorrow. 

FLORENCE BEALS '47. 



Their pictures in the "TATTLER" will 

look so dignified. 
You'll think, "They've changed." 
They haven't. 
They have just grown up. 

FLORENCE BEALS '47. 



28 



THE TATTLER 




First Row: Mrs. Thornton, Ruth Mollison, Mary Lou Bisbee, Cora Warner, Eva 

Jane Sanderson, Mrs. Brown. 
Second Row: Clifford Thayer, Rita Lupien, Barry Purring-ton, Louise Newell. Bob 

Dana, Shirley Hathaway, and Neil Damon. 



Tattler Staff 



T is for the TATTLER the reason for all this press. 

A is for ALL who worked to make it a success. 

T is for Mrs. THORNTON who helped in calm and in stress. 

T is for the TRIALS sometimes endured in excess. 

L is for the LOSS of sleep to make these lines meet. 

E is for EVERYTHING that makes this complete. 

R is for the RESULTS of this extraordinary feat. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



29 




First Row: Phyllis Rhoades, Ruth Bowker, Helen Sylvester, Ruth Mollison. Louise 
Newell, Eva Jane Sanderson, Edward Lezynski, Bob Dana, Rita Lupien, Mrs. Thornton. 

Second Row: Barry Purrington, Clifford Thayer, Viola Fraser, Betty Brooks, Eliza- 
beth Yates, Sue Crone, Mary Lou Bisbee, Thedora Harlow, Doris Graves, Morris 
Healy, Russell Loomis, Neil Damon. 



Review Staff 

The school paper has been published Circulation Dept Doris Graves, 

three times during 1944-1945 under the Viola Fraser, Russell Loomis, 

following staff: Barry Purrington 

-,,., , . - „ T c- j Faculty Advisers .... Mrs. Brown. 

Editor-in-chief . . . Eva Jane Sanderson J __ 

... „ , , T t . Mrs. Thornton 

Assistant .... Edward Lezynski 

Business Manager . . . Louise Newell 

Assistant Ruth Mollison After the first edition it was decided that 

Artist Robert Dana we change the name and a contest was 

Assistant Morris Healy held throughout the school. Robert Dana 

Sports Editor Neil Damon presented the most appropriate name and 

Assistant Clifford Thayer we have since called the paper the "Review" 

Feature Editor .... Helen Sylvester in place of the "Inkspots." It has served as 

Assistants Sue Crone, a means for announcing important events, 

Elizabeth Yates social and extra curricular activities, as well 

Alumni Editor .... Mary Lou Bisbee as keeping the school posted on our alumni. 

Assistant Betty Brooks Sports was discontinued before the last 

Campus Capers Ruth Bowker edition but had an important part in the 

Assistants .... Georgene Harry, first two papers. 

Rita Lupien The "Review" was enjoyed by everyone 

Exchange Editor . .. Theodora Harlw and we hope that the following classes will 

Assistant Phyllis Rhoades continue to have it published each year. 



30 



THE TATTLER 



Pro Merito 




Sue Crone, Helen Sylvester, Shirley Hathaway, Eva Jane Sanderson, Mary Lou Bisbee, 

and Ruth Mollison. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



31 




First Row: Ruth Mollison, Louise Newell, Mary Lou Bisbee, Eva Jane Sanderson. 
Second Row: Doris Graves, Clifford Thayer, Neil Damon, Bob Dana, Ruth Bowker, 
Miss Webber. 



National Forensic League 

OFFICERS 
PRESIDENT. Mary Lou Bisbee SECRETARY, Lou:se Newell 



The members of the Forensic League 
opened their debating season with a prac- 
tice debate at Holyoke High November 3, 
1944. Here we found eight members out for 
debating in our school. The debating pro- 
gram really started December 6, 1944, 
when we held our first regular debate for 
the year. We had two teams at this time. 
On the first team were Mary Lou Bisbee, 
Louise Newell, for the affirmative, and 
Ruth Mollison and Eva Jane Sanderson for 
the negative. The second team had Clifford 
Thayer, Neil Damon as affirmative and Ruth 
Bowker and Robert Dana as negative. We 
held twelve debates throughout the year — 
losing nine and winning three. 

On February 3, 1945, four of us went 
to the Student Congress in Westfield. Here 



we were divided into the House and the 
Senate, which discussed and passed bills 
brought before the houses by different 
schools. 

The next week, February 19, 1945, five of 
us went to the New England Student Con- 
gress at A. I. C. in Springfield. We were 
again divided into the two different houses. 
At noon we were served a lunch and at 
night a banquet which was followed by 
dancing. This ended the debating season. 

In March, one of our debating students, 
Ruth Mollison, brought the school the 
honor of representing it in the district 
contest of the American Legion Oratory 
held in Orange. 

Five members of the Forensic League, 
Continued on paoe 36 



32 



THE TATTLER 




First Row: Clifford Thayer, Edward Lezynski, Captain Neil Damon, Marshall Warner, 

Morris Healy. 
Second Row: Doald Bates, Russell Warner, Bob Dana, Frank Collins, Russell Loomis. 
Absent: Robert Smith. 



Basketball 



Because of the war, Williamsburg High 
School did not have a very successful year 
of basketball. At the beginning of the year 
we were very fortunate in having Fred 
Healy coach our team and he gave the boys 
a real start and scheduled many games 
with different schools. Also, this season 
for the first time in three years we were 
able to form a Franklin League. This 
league was made up of Sanderson Acad- 
emy, Powers, Charlemont and Williams- 
burg. 

Our first league game was played with 
powers and we defeated them by a 
score of 25 to 16. Immediately after this 



our coach accepted a war job and was un- 
able to coach our team any longer. Then 
Jim M:Allister was called to the service of 
the country and our team was left without 
a coach and a valuable player. We with- 
drew from the Franklin League and then 
out of basketball completely. 

Although we did not play many games 
this season we showed many freshmen the 
fundamental rules of basketball and now 
Burgy High has a fine team for the future. 

This year the team will give up two play- 
ers, Thayer who has played this year and 
Captain Damon who has played for four 
years. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



33 




First Row: Mary Lou Bisbee, Floyd Merritt. 

Second Row: Clifford Thayer, Eva Jane Sanderson, Morris Healy, Walter Lesure, 
Doris Graves, and Miss Healy. 



School Orchestra 



During the past year 1944-1945, the 
school orchestra under the direction of 
Miss Olive Healy has taken a more im- 
portant position in school activities. Under 
the new one-session plan it has become 
easier to hold practice and two thirty-min- 
ute sessions are held every week. The 
orchestra has played at various occasions 



such as gatherings held in the school audi- 
torium and for Grange entertainments 
during the year and although many difficul- 
ties have arisen, it has been very successful. 
Graduation last year took quite a share 
of our talent, but we hope it will be 
possible for the orchestra to carry on as 
it has for the past two years. 



34 



THE TATTLER 



Alumni Notes 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President .... Norman Graves '34 
Vice-President . . . Shirley Meisse '40 

Secretary Evelyn Kmit '35 

Treasurer June Bowker '41 

ALUMNI IN SERVICE 



1915 — Leonard Walpole 


U. S. Army 


1916 — Thomas Wells 


U. S. Army 


1917 — Maurice Jenkins 


U. S. Army 


1918— Edward Dolan 


U. S. Army 


1921— Bernard Mansfield 


U. S. Army 


1925 — Alvan Barrus 


U. S. Army 


Bruce Nash 


Seabee 


Wilbur Purrington 


U. S. Army 


Robert Smiley 


U. S. Army 


1927— Ronald Emerick 


U. S. Army 


Robert Tetro 


U. S. Navy 


1928— Walter Utley 


U. S. Army 


Leroy Weeks 


U. S. Army 


1919 — James Coogan 


U. S. Army 


Davis Snow 


U. S. Army 


1930 — Gordon Nash 


U. S. Army 


1931— Raymond Lee 


U. S. Army 


G. William Merritt 


Seabee 


1932 — Edward Sheehan 


U. S. Army 


1933 — Richard Burke 


U. S. Navy 


Ruth Merritt 


WAVES 


George Rustemeyer 


Army Air Corps 


1934— Richard Field 


U. S. Army 


Chester Kin? 


U. S. Army 


Gilbert Loud 


Marines 


George Mollison 


U. S. Navy 


Edward Murphy 


U. S. Army 


Nancy Sheehan 


Army Nurse 


Thomas Stone 


U. S. Navy 


1935 — Allen Bisbee 


U. S. Army 


Raymond Bradford 


U. S. Army 


Rodney Gailbraith 


U. S. Army 


Bessie Muraski 


Army Nurse 


Hans Nietshe 


U. S. Army 


Catherine Paul 


Army Nurse 


Edwin Russell 


U. S. Army 


Paul V. Russell 


U. S. Army 


Otis Webb 


U. S. Army 


1936 — Vardic Golash 


U. S. Army 


Walter Golash 


U. S. Army 


John Walshe 


U. S. Army 


Howard Wilson 


U. S. Army 



1937— Annette Barrus 
Barbara Burt 
Lawrence Corbett 
Edward Fontaine 
William Howe 
Francis Packard 
Winnifred Packard 
Janice Penn 
Wendell Pittsinger 
Vernon West 

1938— Richard Ames 
Ruth Black 
Robert Bradley 
Roberta Colburn 
Thomas Coogan 
Douglas Fairbanks 

1939— Richard Bates 
Carlton Field 
Adam Golash 
Warren Gould 
Marguerite E. Penn 
Francis Soltys 
Raymond Stone 
James Stone 
George Warner. Jr. 
Phyllis West 

1940— Francis Bartlett 
Myla Campbell 
Raymond Johndrow 
Francis Molloy 
Bernard Murphy 
Ashton Rustemeyer 
William Ryan 
Bernard Sampson 
Winthrop Stone 
Henry Wilson 

1941 — Edward Ames 
Ralph Bates 
Russell Bisbee 
Leo Dymerski 
Harold Hillenbrand 
Frederick King 
Henry Kopka 
Robert McAllister 
Lucius Merritt 
Robert Newell 
Adelbert Roberge 
Gerald Larkin 



WAVES 

WAVES 

Marines 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

Army Nurse 

Army Nurse 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 
WAVES 

U.S. Army 
WAVES 
Marines 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Army 

WAC 

U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 

Army Air Corps 

Army iAr Corps 

WAVES 

U. S. Army 

Marines 

U.S. Navy 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 

U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 

Navy Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



35 



1942— John Barrus 

Michael Batura 
Robert Edwards 
Edward Golash 
John Pavelcsyk 
Harry Warner 
David West 

1943— Donald Campbell 
Helen Carver 
Joseph Haigh 
Elizabeth Harlow 
Millard Hathaway 
Roger King 
Shirley Knight 
Irene Metz 
Frank Munson 
Robert Munson 
John O'Brien 
Charlotte Otis 
Arlene Sabo 
Mildred Shaw 
Lester Shaw 
Donald Wickland 



Army Air Corps 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 

WAC 

U. S. Navy 

U. C. Cadet Nurse 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Cadet Nurse 

U. S. Cadet Nurse 

Army Air Corps 

U. S. Army 

Merchant Marines 

U. S. Cadet Nurse 

U. S. Cadet Nurse 

U. S. Cadet Nurse 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Navy 



CLASS 

Robert Algustoski 
Norman Bates 
Charlotte Brooks 

Ruth Carver 

Roberta Clark 

Martha Deane 
Rene Desmarais 
Phyllis Granger 
Clarice Graves 
Donald Harry 
Frederic Healy Jr. 

Donna Hobbs 
Agnes Matrishon 
James McAllister 
Ruth Munson 
Harlan Nye 
Merton Nye 
John Polwrek 
Margaret Ryan 
Edward Sincage 
Justin Stone 
Marion Sylvester 
Marion Warner 



OF 1944 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 

Civil Service, 

Washington, D. C. 

Civil Service, 

Washington, D. C. 

Civil Service, 

Washington, D. C. 

Commercial College 

Navy Reserve 

Commercial College 

Commercial College 

Bradley Field 

Roosevelt Field, 

Long Island 

Mass. State College 

Taxi Operator 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Cadet Nurse 

U. S. Army 

Home 

Prophylactic Brush Co. 

Grants Card Factory 

Grants Card Factory 

Home 

Commercial College 

Grants Card Factory 



ALUMNI DEATHS 

Mildred (Wells) Munson '17 

James Stone '39 Killed in Action 

Bernard Murphy '40 Killed in Action 

Frederick King '41 Killed in Action 

Gerald Larkin '41 Killed in Action 

ALUMNI BIRTHS 

Gertrude Heath Jennings '35 Son 

Catherine Vining Doyle '35 Daughter 

Shirley Campbell Hathaway '40 Daughter 

Doris Sabo Elmes '39 Daughter 

Hazel Torrey McAvoy '39 Son 

Edward Foster '25 Son 

Robert Bisbee '37 Son 

Ruth Ellen Newell Barrus '38 Son 

Doris Newell Webb '39 Daughter 

Raymond Johndrow '40 Son 

Bernard Sampson '40 Son 

Evelyn Rustemeyer Kmit '36 Son 

Marjorie Damon Thorns '34 Son 

Ruth Pittsinger Hinton '32 Daughter 

Ruth Dodge Witherell '39 Son 

Robert Merritt '30 Son 

Doris Williams Dodge '39 Daughter 

ALUMNI MARRIAGES 

Ruth Evans '39 to Oscar Lawton, Williams- 
burg 

Jean Warner '42 to Philip Norris, West- 
hampton 

Frederick Allen '41 to Pauline Sicard, Flor- 
ence 

Myla Campbell '40 to Richard Gload, Platts- 
burg, N. Y. — Marines 

Leroy Weeks '28 to Evelyn Keyes, Conway 

Hope Jarvis '41 to Malcolm Turner, Am- 
herst, U. S. Army 

Logia Jablonski '40 to Victor Jordan, In- 
dian Orchard 

George Judd '33 to Charlotte Deane, Wil- 
liamsburg 

Donald Otis '39 to Marguerite Thayer, Wil- 
liamsburg 

Lida Miner '41 to Joseph Brunell, South 
Hadley Falls 

Rita LaCourse '40 to Lawrence Corbett '37, 
U. S. Marines 

Lucius Merritt '41 to Mildred Blair, Cor- 
nelia, Ga. 



36 



THE TATTLER 



Edwin Russell '35 to Janet E. Baker, Ches- 
terfield 

Rowena Damon '22 to Allen Houghton, West 
Springfield 

Winnifred Packard '37 to John Eldracher, 
U. S. Navy 

Esther Mollison '41 to Peter Korowski, Mer- 
chant Marines 

Frances Metz '38 to James Fulwider, U. S. 
Navy 

Carlton Field '39 to Margaret Letitia Co- 
chrane, England 

Doris Dymerski '42 to John Szarkowski, 
Hadley, U. S. Navy 

M. Betty Penn '39 to Ernest A. Richard- 
son, California, U. S. Army 



JOKES 

By C. THAYER 

Police Judge: Well, Sam, about your son 
stealing those chickens, I've decided to let 
him off this time, but why don't you show 
him the right away? 

Sam: Ah done tried hard, Judge, but he 
goes and gets hisself caught anyhow. 



Sophomore: What is heredity. Mr. Fos- 
ter? 

Mr. Foster: Heredity is something every 
man believes in until his son begins to act 
like a fool. 



NATIONAL FORENSIC LEAGUE 

Continued from page SI 



in April, entered the declamation competi- 
tion. The members were Mary Lou Bisbee, 
Eva Sanderson, Ruth Mollison, Floyd Mer- 
ritt and Doris Graves. 

We are very grateful to our new coach, 
Miss Helena Webber, who did a very good 
job in coaching us, and also to her assistant, 
Mrs. Henry Thornton. 

Now that the season is over, we of the 
Forensic League hope that next year the 
new members will have as interesting a 
time as we did in participating in the work 
of the National Forensic League. 



IN THE DAYS OF OUR YOUTH 

Top left — Rita Lupien 

Center top — Ruth Bean 

Top right — Ruth Mollison 

Left — Eva Jane Sanderson 

Right— Ruth LaCasse 

Center top left — Louise Newell 

Center top right — Lorraine Jones 

Center lower left — Phyllis Rhoades 

Center lower right — Mary Lou Bisbee 

Lower left — Mary Louise and Louise Newell 

Center bottom — Clifford Thayer and Neil 

Damon 
Lower right — Barry Purrington 



A recruit was being given an intelligence 
test in the army. 

"What would happen if one of your eara 
were cut off by a bayonet?" asked the ex- 
aminer. 

"I couldn't hear so well." 

"What would happen if your other ear 
were cut off?" 
"I couldn't see." 
"What do you mean?" 

"My hat would fall down over my ears." 



Actor: Last night I had the audience 
glued to their seats. 

Critic: Well, that's one way of keeping 
them there. 



A soldier was telling a friend of his 
narrow escape. 

"The bullet went in my chest and came 
out my back," he said. 

"But," objected his friend, 'if it did that 
it would go through your heart and kill 
you." 

"My heart was in my mouth at the time," 
was the reply. 



Autographs 




Compliments of 
Packard s Soda Slioppe 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES, MAGAZINES, GREETING CARDS 

Patent Medicines 

Opposite Town Hall 
OUR OWN ICE CREAM FOUNTAIN AND BOOTH SERVICE 



Compliments of 



R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 



LANDSCAPING and TREE SERVICE 



Williamsburg, Mass. 



Telephone 211 



Old Goshen Road I 



Compliments of 

The Clar$> Farm 

TRY 

OUR MAPLE SYRUP 

For Farm and Village Property 

Consult Silas Snow 

Telephone 3563 Williamsburg 

Compliments of 

B. G. HigSgins 

MFGR. POUNDED ASH BASKETS 
Chesterfield, Mass. 



WRECKED CARS MADE NEW 



Carpenter s Bod^ Shop ! 



General Fender & Body Repairs 



Spray Painting 



Phone 3337-W 



51 King St. 



Compliments of 



WHALE INN 



GOSHEN, 



MASS. 



£«^»-04»<0^H»0<^^0« 



»0'^0«»0^»0-^04 



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Grant Paper Products, Inc. 



LEEDS, MASS. 



W. E. LONDERGAN 



PRINTING & PUBLISHING 



30 Crafts Ave. 



Tel. 1740 



NORTHAMPTON 



GOOD SHOES 




Correctly Fitted 




Reasonably Priced 


Compliments of 


David Boot Shop 


A FRIEND 


221 Main Street 




NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 






■ IIBBII . . . „ ||B| „ B , M „ — „. 



Compliments of 

Herlin^ s 
DRY GOODS STORE 



76 Maple Street 



Florence 



Trembla^ Dru| Co. 

THE REXALL STORE 

M. L. Sender, Ph.G., Reg. M., Prop. 

SAME SERVICE AS ALWAYS 

Pay Gas, Electric and 
Telephone Bills Here 

Telephone 2300 131 Main Street 

FLORENCE 



Ward Miller 

The Westinghouse Store 

OIL BURNERS & SERVICE 

Home Insulation 



14 Center Sti-eet 
Northampton 



Phone 2123-R 
Massachusetts 



Francis L. LaMontadne 



PAINTER & DECORATOR 



Telephone 467-W 12 No. Maple St. 



FLORENCE 



Compliments of 



Northampton Street Railway Co. 



LOUIS D. PELLISSIER, 

General Manager. 



M»O«^»0^»O^^»O«^»O^^M>^^»O^^M>^»O«a» 


_o - 


Beer>e s Lunch 

A Good Place to Eat 


Compliments of 


TOASTED SANDWICHES 


WM. J. SHEEHAN & CO. 


Berkshire Trail A. L. Beebe, Prop. 


Haydenville 


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Tires, Batteries and Accessories 


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Compliments of 



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ELY FUNERAL HOME 

CHARLES E. ELY 



Telephone 1292-W 



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Lady Assistant 




This is but 
one of many in our 
new stock of stylish 
birth month rings 

Dearin^ s 

JEWELERS 
Northampton Easthampton 



Compliments of 

A Friend 



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Haydenville, Mass. 



Franklin Kin^, Jr. 

See This Office About the New- 
Low Cost Theft and Robbery 

INSURANCE 



277 Main Street 



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NORTHAMPTON SOUTH HADLEY 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 

AT 



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mann s 



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a 

I Candy Mailed 

I 

| Refreshing Sodas 

l 



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Fine Ice Cream 



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185 Main Street 



Northampton, 



Mass. 



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ros. 



NORTHAMPTON 



Fashion's For Your Small Fry 



at 



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44 MAIN ST. 
NORTHAMPTON 

. From One Minute to 14 Years . . . 



Compliments of A Friend 



Thorough business training was never so essential for so many people 

Northampton Commercial College 
John C. Pickett, Principal 

"The School of Thoroughness" 



Compliments of 



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Telephone 4331—4332 



Haydenville 



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Store 

WILLIAMSBURG 



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Fuel & Ice Co. 

DONALD OUTHUSE 
Williamsburg: 



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Station 



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WILLIAMSBURG 



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— DAILY TRIPS — 
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Hillcrest Farm 

Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 

SINGLE COMB 
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Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 

WILLIAMSBURG 



Will 



iamshurg Garage 

C. K. HATHAWAY 
Telephone 4351 

SERVICE STATION 

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WILLIAMSBURG 

HERBS and ANNUALS 

CHOICE PERENNIALS 

for 
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WILLIAMSBURG 



R. F. Taylor 

MILK TRUCKING 

and 

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Tel. Williamsburg 4981 



Goshen 



Athletic Supplies 

FOR EVERY SPORT 

T. A. PURSEGLOVE 



15 State Street 



I 



Woodworth 
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O. J. Bonneau, Prop. 



200 Main St. 



Phone 2390 



Northampton, Mass. 



o 

Hardware, Sporting Goods, 



Fishing Tackle, Baseball, Tennis 
and Camping Items 

Foster-Farrar Co. 

162 Main Street 
Northampton, Mass. 

For the young man who graduates 

this year we have everything that 

he will need for this important 

occasion. 



Merritt Clark & C 



o. 



NORTHAMPTON 



Tne E. & J. Cigar Co. 

WHOLESALE 
TOBACCONISTS 



23 Main Street 



Northampton 



Hill Brotli 



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Main Street, Northampton 



PAINTS and WALL PAPER , 

Pierce s Paint Store 



Telephone 1207 



196 Main Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



SMART WEARING APPAREL FOR 

YOUNG MEN ( 

AT MODERATE PRICES j 

Harry Daniel Associates 

Northampton. Mass. 



Compliments of 



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»0-^^0«^»0-0^0-^B»-0<« 



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and SOFT SUGAR 



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When IN NEED of 
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For Men and Boys 
Try 

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Service — Quality — Satisfaction 



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THE 




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and 


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WILLIAMSBURG POST 
OFFICE 




^m ^ — — ^^ — ^m ^— ^_ ^». ^».~^»~-^».~^»»^^.. 



O. T. DEWHURST 



OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS 

Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects 
in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. A little 
fore-sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will 
help them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 



201 MAIN STREET 



Telephone 184-W 



NORTHAMPTON 



C. F. JENKINS 



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FLORENCE 


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and 
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92 King Street 


A FRIEND 


Telephone 772 Northampton 






Brooks Garage 


Compliments of 


COLONIAL ESSO DEALER 


Snyder's Express 


GAS — OIL — ACCESSORIES 
Electric Welding 




Route 9 Berkshire Trail 




GOSHEN, MASS. 









Compliments of 



HERRICK STUDIO 



Phone 1919 



100 Main St. 



Compliments of 



I The Vermont St 



ore 



239 Main Street 
Northampton 



David Boot Shop 



GO 



T0 BRANDLE'S ™ ST 



To Save Time and Trouble for Your 



PRESCRIPTIONS 



MAIN STREET 



NORTHAMPTON 



Open Evenings by Appointment 



Compliments of 



E. J. Qusetti 



Haydenville 



Snultz Beauty Shop 

For Those Who Want the Best 
And the Most For Their Money 

223 Main Street Up One Flight 

Telephone 567 



YOU MAY ALWAYS DEPEND UPON THE QUALITY 



OF FLOWERS WHICH COME FROM 




FLOWERS 





E. J. Gare & Son 


Compliments of 






DIAMONDS 


CLASS OF '48 






112 Main Street Northampton 


A. Soltys 


Come In to Visit 


MEATS GROCERIES 


Kin^s Paint & Paper Store 


VEGETABLES 


COMPLETELY NEW 


Telephone 223 Haydenville 


157 Main Street Northampton 



3 

| Compliments of 



C. O. CARLSON 



GOSHEN, MASS. 



LaFleur B 



eur r>ros. 

"The PAINT People" 
PAINTS - - WALLPAPER 



45 King Street 



Tel. 374-M 



Compliments of 



The Twelve Maples 



CHESTERFIELD 



FIRESTONE 

HOME & AUTO SUPPLIES 

Tennis Balls Archery Supplies 
Bicycle Tires Golf Balls 

21 Pleasant St., Northampton 
Phone 2429 





Bre^uet s Service Station 


Compliments of 


MOBILGAS MOBILOIL 


A FRIEND 


MOBILUBRICATION 




Florence, Mass. 



J. J. DEYETTE CO 



35 STATE ST. 



SEPTIC TANKS 

RANGE BOILERS 

CABINET SINKS 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

COMBINATION RANGES 

FURNACES 

STEAM BOILERS 



HARDWARE and PLUMBING SUPPLIES 



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CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. LEROY CHILSON 

AWNINGS — VENETIAN BLINDS 

FURNITURE COVERINGS & UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 



Automobile Plate and Safety Glass 

Auto Tops and Upholstery 

Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 



Furniture Upholstering 
| Harness Shop 
i Slip Covers, Cushions 

I 34 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 

HENRY A. BIDWELL 

INSURANCE OF EVERY FORM 

REAL ESTATE SURETY BONDS 

BIDWELL TRAVEL SERVICE 

"Everything Pertaining to Travel" 

Nonotuck Savings Bank Building (Second Floor) 

78 MAIN STREET NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Offiice 351 — TELEPHONES — Residence 348 



Martin A. Paddock 




TAILORING CO. 


Compliments of 


FINE CUSTOM TAILORING 




FOR MEN AND WOMEN 


A FRIEND 


4 Crafts Avenue Next to City Hall 






Herman A. Cohn Phone 1426 


Compliments of 


The Fair Store 


Hathaway & Culver 


WOMEN'S, MEN'S 
and 




CHILDREN'S WEAR 


37 South Street Williamsburg 


SHOES 




27-29 Pleasant St. Northampton 



BISBEE BROTHERS 



Get Our Prices on Anything You Need. 



TEL. WILLIAMSBURG 271 



and 



CHESTERFIELD 2145 



RUBY'S 



Northampton's Largest Furniture Store 



15 Bridge St. 



Phone 3519 



Northampton 



LIONEL L. FOUCHER, Mgr. 




10 Center St., 



CENTER 

Northampton 



Northampton's Only Complete 
Little Folks Furniture Store 

j CRIBS — CARRIAGE — YOUTH BEDS 
j MATTRESSES and TOYS 



Harlow s 
Luggage Repairs 



Bill Folds 



Toilet Kits 



EXPERT LOCKSMITH 

24 Center Street Telephone 155-W 

Northampton 



Handicrart Shop 

Graduation and Wedding Gifts 

Jewelry 

Handkerchiefs 

Baby Things 
Handmade Articles 

18 Center St. Northampton 

Phone 3690 



Compliments of 

National Shoe Repairing 

John Mateja, Prop. 

15 Masonic Street 

Tel. 826-W 
Northampton, Mass. 



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